Series Review: Flawed and Perfect by Cecelia Ahern

Flawed and Perfect by Cecelia Ahern

Find the series on Goodreads


Cecelia Ahern- FlawedYou will be punished…

Celestine North lives a perfect life. She’s a model daughter and sister, she’s well-liked by her classmates and teachers, and she’s dating the impossibly charming Art Crevan.

But then Celestine encounters a situation where she makes an instinctive decision. She breaks a rule and now faces life-changing repercussions. She could be imprisoned. She could be branded. She could be found flawed.

In her breathtaking young adult debut, bestselling author Cecelia Ahern depicts a society where perfection is paramount and flaws lead to punishment. And where one young woman decides to take a stand that could cost her everything.


Cecelia Ahern- Perfect

Celestine North is Flawed.

Ever since Judge Crevan declared her the number one threat to the public, she has been a ghost, on the run with Carrick, the only person she can trust.

But Celestine has a secret—one that could bring the entire Flawed system crumbling to the ground. A secret that has already caused countless people to go missing.

Judge Crevan is gaining the upper hand, and time is running out for Celestine. With tensions building, Celestine must make a choice: save just herself or risk her life to save all Flawed people.

 

 


My Review

star-rating-greystar-rating-greystar-rating-greystar-rating-greystar-rating-grey

Give this series to your children. That was all I could think while I was reading these books; that tweens or teens, whenever they’re ready, are reading these books. That’s not to say I didn’t enjoy them, I did, but more importantly the messages in these books need to be making their way to the next generation of people.

I’ve learned that to be courageous is to feel fear within, every step of the way. Courage does not take over; it fights and struggles with every word you say and every step you take. It’s a battle or a dance as to whether to let it pervade. It takes courage to overcome, but it takes extreme fear to be courageous.

-Flawed

On my cover of perfect there is a quote from a review that says ‘immediately gripping, fast paced’ and it was. And I was so thankful, because I had just been trying to finish another book to review and it was struggle street… I needed some fast paced action in my life. Again, I think the pace of this books means that even if you have someone in your life that doesn’t like to read (I’m thinking a teenager), this will keep them interested.

Now, back to why I liked it. It was fast paced and as a reader I am learning that I need that. I also enjoyed reading a book that had all these life lessons in them, and there are a lot. The main character, Celestine, learns a lot about herself and about others; she learns to question things. This journey was something that I enjoyed reading about. In fact, I want to give this book not only to teenagers to see what they learn, but also to those adults who believe gossip magazines, and see if it changes their perspective of the world.

Flawed is about Celestine realizing that she has been living life with out question, that she has accepted the social norms and lived life within them. During Flawed she begins to realize that that didn’t make her a ‘good’ person and that perhaps sticking up for others is what makes her good.

Perfect is about learning who to trust and how to trust yourself.

There’s the person you think you should be and there’s the person you really are.

-Perfect

It’s also about making decisions about what is right and what is easy.

Flawed and Perfect were gifted to me by Harper Collins but, as with Good as Gone, don’t think for one moment that this has changed what I would say about them. Above mentioned, unfinished book… also from Harper Collins.

This series is a five star series for me. Because of what it teaches you and gets you thinking about, because of the adventure, because of the complexities of the characters and because I couldn’t put either of them down until I was finished.

And if you are a parent reading this, read these books first, then have your tweenager/ teenager read them. Then talk about it. Take the teachable moments. The social worker in me, who usually hides from the internet, begs you to.

 

name-jesiree

p.s. I found these alternative covers as well. I don’t know anything about them (if they are first or foreign editions etc) but they are so striking I had to put them somewhere.

 

 

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